#Leadership #LeadershipMatters https://t.co/vrR682ccYk

*

#ShipRecycling Market Commentary - Week 03 - SWIFT RETREAT! China continues to import scrap steel from the sub-con… https://t.co/NPQ5ZN8WAg

*

Watch Dr. Anil Sharma, Founder & CEO of GMS, sharing his insights during Blue-C ImmediaSea's press event on Ship Re… https://t.co/tuxXUIN3jE

*

Demystifying Ship Recycling - Issue 06! This issue focuses on the cleaning of oil-stained sections at HKC complian… https://t.co/uYLd7sOuNT

*

BLOG & PRESS RELEASE

 

Demystifying Ship Recycling - Issue 06

 

Cleaning of oil stained sections at HKC compliant recycling facilities. 

Ships delivered to HKC compliant recycling yards are cut as per ship specific Ship Recycling Plan. Any type of ship has various tanks to store lube oils, fuel oils, sludge, and bilge water. The main engine and aux engine crankcases contain lube oils. Fuel oils and lube oils are recovered and resold in the local market. Sludge and bilge water are disposed of as per the Gujarat Enviro Protection Infra Limited (GEPIL) guidelines. The empty tank bottoms are spread with the sand to absorb any uncleaned oil, and the oily sand is disposed of at landfills. 

Sections of these tanks contain oil stains. The onboard oily block is cleaned as practicable as possible along the cutting line, and then the cut block is lifted directly from the vessel using crawler cranes and placed on an oily block cleaning zone. The HSE officer conducts a cleanliness inspection before lifting the block from the vessel and cleaning the block at the oily block cleaning zone. Photographic evidence of before and after the cleaning of blocks is maintained at the recycling facility. The cleaned block is moved to the cutting area (secondary or tertiary) for further cutting into truck loadable sizes of steel plates. 

ship-recycling-oil-block

The oily block cleaning area has an impermeable floor and drainage system. Chemical detergents are applied to the oily blocks, and blocks are washed with the water. The wash water is collected via a drainage system in the underground tank. 

Collected wash water contains chemical detergent and oil, therefore it is disposed of in GEPIL.  GEPIL has adequate infrastructure to treat the oily bilge water.  

While recycling oil tankers, it is a regular practice to clean oil-stained steel sections at designated cleaning zones to make them oil-free. Similarly, sections of the main engine and aux engine crankcases are cleaned at oily block cleaning zones.

Recycling facilities are equipped with oil spill containment kits. These kits have an adequate inventory of oil spill containment material such as oil absorbent pads, sawdust, boom, shovels, oil-resistant gloves, disposable overalls, waste bags, etc.

SOPs are developed and regular drills are conducted at recycling facilities to contain oil spills. HKC compliant yards contain the equipment and facilities to protect the soil from oil contamination because of the oil-stained steel sections. 

Read More

 

Turning the tide in 2021 after tricky times in 2020

 

2020 was a rollercoaster year for recycling and shipping markets across the globe. The impact of Covid started to really take hold in the second quarter of the year with virtually all ports closing for 'as is' deliveries and sub continent recycling locations also shutting down for the delivery / beaching of units as virus cases surged. Seafarers and ships were stranded at sea as recycling markets tumbled by around USD 150/LDT from above USD 400/LDT to much below USD 300/LDT. Local yards closed and labourers returned to home towns as stay at home notices were observed and activity came to a standstill for a period of 2-3 months.

From the end of May / June onwards and with the impact of severe lockdowns in India and elsewhere starting to be felt, activity slowly resumed with greater care taken towards health and safety and preventing the spread of an easily transmissible virus. Finally, vessels stuck at sea for a period of months were allowed to beach, albeit at much reduced prices.

Slowly but surely prices started to improve, first in Pakistan, then in India, and finally Bangladesh as demand and raw material started to shift from local plots once again. Pakistan indeed came back to the table after a period of almost two years on the sidelines due to safety concerns and closures following several accidents on tankers and a historical currency crisis that gripped the country. With prices surging up into the mid 300s/LDT again come the third quarter of the year, a short lived cartel was formed in Bangladesh to try and control prices. This only resulted in vessels being pushed towards a rampant Pakistan and India market until frustrations started to tell and the cartel fell apart.

Towards the end of 2020, Bangladesh therefore became the market to watch again as prices came up above USD 400/LDT to regain much of the ground lost and more over the course of the year and both India and Pakistan followed in hot pursuit as steel prices soared to new record highs with China starting to import again following the iron ore ban from Australia.

The prospects for 2021 therefore look bright as all markets currently trade in the mid USD 400s/LDT and above again.

 

Author

Jamie Dalzell, Senior Trader, GMS Singapore

Read More

 

Demystifying Ship Recycling - Issue 05

 

Impermeable Floor at the Recycling Facilities in India. 

End-of-life vessels are delivered to the recycling facilities located on the coast of the Alang, India. The Hong Kong Convention (HKC) compliant recycling facilities in India have built the impermeable floors in recycling plots adjacent to the beach. The impermeable floors are constructed from multiple layers of gravels, coarse sand, plain cement concrete, and reinforced cement concrete. The usual thickness of the concrete floor is observed between 60 cm to 100 cm.

In fact, some yards have designed impermeable floors beyond the requirement and such yards have provided extra layers of geomembranes. The geo membranes have very low permeability, and they are made from synthetic materials such as High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and Linear Low-Density Polyethylene (LLDPE). Geo membranes used in impermeable flooring at ship recycling facilities are tear, impact, and puncture-resistant. These geomembranes prevent seepage of any fluids to the soil. 

The concrete floors are further protected from damages occurring due to heavy slices of the vessel’s hull by covering them with steel plates in secondary and tertiary cutting zones. These steel plates absorb the impact due to the heavy slice of the vessel’s structure. The damaged concrete surfaces are promptly repaired to avoid any seepage. Furthermore, these impermeable floors are connected to the drainage system.

The fluids such as oil, bilge water, and chemicals falling on the impermeable floor can be easily contained and cleaned on the impermeable floor. The rust particles, paint chips, and dust are collected and properly disposed of. The metal slag generated during the gas cutting is also collected and disposed of suitably.

Markings for emergency escape, muster stations, and various other identifications are done on the impermeable floor which keeps the markings intact for a longer time and makes convenient recognition for the workers. 

The scientific approach perceived by the HKC compliant recycling facilities for sustainable ship recycling is noteworthy. 


About Authors:

Kiran Thorat is a Sustainable Ship & Offshore Recycling Executive at GMS, where he looks after sustainable ship recycling projects. Kiran believes that Sustainable Recycling is an integral part of Sustainable Shipping and a notable example of a circular economy. He holds a Bachelor's Degree from Marine Engineering and Research Institute (DMET), India, and a Master's Degree in Energy, Trade, and Finance from Cass Business School, London.

Dr. Anand M. Hiremath is a Civil Engineer and holds a Master's Degree in Environmental Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati (IIT Guwahati), India. He was awarded Doctorate Degree in the year 2016 for his research work on Ship Recycling by the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT Bombay), India. In addition, he has a diploma in Industrial safety, is a qualified lead auditor for ISO 9k, 14k and 18k. Dr. Hiremath published the first practical handbook on ship recycling, entitled: "The Green Handbook: A Practical Checklist to Monitor the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships" which highlights the procedures the GMS RSRP follows to help both Ship and Yard Owners recycle a vessel in an environmentally-friendly manner.


For further enquiries, contact us at green@gmsinc.net 

Read More

 

Demystifying Ship Recycling - Issue 04

 

Safe removal and recycling of batteries recovered during Ship Recycling.

 

Batteries are used as an emergency source of electric power on ships of all types. Lead is usually found in lead-acid batteries. Lead is considered as heavy metal and correct handling of it is essential. Similarly, contact with acid is hazardous to human health.

End-of-Life vessels are delivered to the Hong Kong Convention (HKC) compliant recycling facilities in India with the Inventory of Hazardous Materials (IHM) part I, II, and III. Batteries are listed, located, and quantified in the IHM. As per ship specific Ship Recycling Plan, the SOPs are prepared to remove and dispose of these batteries. Only trained workers are allowed to remove the batteries. Workers are given adequate PPE, consisting of hardhat, safety shoes, gloves, overalls, glasses, and masks. Batteries that contain acids and lead are isolated from the electrical power cables, transported, and stored at designated areas in recycling facilities by trained workers. The designated area is well ventilated. The workers are made aware of the possibility of rapid charge release from the batteries and their heavyweights. Safe manual lifting practices are followed.

ship-recycling-demystified

 

Extra care is taken not to cause any physical damage to the batteries to avoid any acid splash (electrolyte). The workers are also trained to handle acid spills and first aid measures in case of contact is made with the acid.

The batteries are sold to the authorized recyclers for recycling purposes and the battery submission manifests are maintained at the recycling yards.

The increasing safety culture and strict compliance to the SOPs at the HKC compliant recycling facilities are admirable 

 

About Authors:

Kiran Thorat is a Sustainable Ship & Offshore Recycling Executive at GMS, where he looks after sustainable ship recycling projects. Kiran believes that Sustainable Recycling is an integral part of Sustainable Shipping and a notable example of a circular economy. He holds a Bachelor's Degree from Marine Engineering and Research Institute (DMET), India, and a Master's Degree in Energy, Trade, and Finance from Cass Business School, London.


Dr. Anand M. Hiremath is a Civil Engineer and holds a Master's Degree in Environmental Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati (IIT Guwahati), India. He was awarded Doctorate Degree in the year 2016 for his research work on Ship Recycling by the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT Bombay), India. In addition, he has a diploma in Industrial safety, is a qualified lead auditor for ISO 9k, 14k and 18k. Dr. Hiremath published the first practical handbook on ship recycling, entitled: "The Green Handbook: A Practical Checklist to Monitor the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships" which highlights the procedures the GMS RSRP follows to help both Ship and Yard Owners recycle a vessel in an environmentally-friendly manner.


For further enquiries, contact us at green@gmsinc.net 

Read More

Demystifying Ship Recycling - Issue 01

The Myth: Ships are broken down by hands in recycling yards in South Asian Countries and workers had to lift steel pieces with bare hands.

The Reality:

Hong Kong International Convention for Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships (HKC) Compliant Ship Recycling Yards are equipped with cranes of different capacities ranging from Safe Working Load (SWL) of 200T to 12T. Cranes are used for distinct purposes.

In the ship recycling facilities, ships are cut in three different zones. The primary cutting zone is the vessel itself. A large slice of the vessel's hull is marked and cut as per the approved ship-specific Ship Recycling Plan (SRP). While marking and cutting the slice, factors like ship stability and SWL of the handling crane are considered. These heavy blocks are lifted by the heavy-duty crane (SWL 200 T) from the vessel and transferred to the secondary cutting zone without any contact with the intertidal zone. In the secondary cutting zone, the larger slice is cut down into smaller slices. The cutting is done in such a way that larger plates are extracted for useful applications. While doing this, the slices need to be cut in smaller sections and often aligned to get the right access for the cutting torch. Medium capacity cranes (SWL 35 T) are used for handling smaller slices in the secondary cutting zone. The same crane is used to transfer lighter sections to the tertiary zones, where stiffeners and brackets are cut into smaller parts.

The Cranes with SWL 12 to 18T are used to load the extracted steel plates into the truck used for transportation. These steel plates are transported to steel rolling mills to make steel bars which are used in the construction industry, and scrap steel is sent to electric arc furnaces.

In Indian recycling yards, only lighter pieces (lesser than 2 Kg) of scrap steel are hand lifted by the workers only for segregation purposes. They are provided with adequate PPE. Recycling facilities based in Bangladesh use cranes with magnetic grabs to handle the steel plates and scrap pieces.

The workers involved in gas cutting wear adequate PPE, including hard hats, overalls, safety shoes, gloves, masks, and gas cutting glasses. A qualified safety officer supervises the complete process.
 
The cranes are inspected and load tested every six months to ensure the cranes' good health by the competent authorities.

It is incredible to see the progress made by the recycling facilities in India. In the entire process of removing slices from the vessel's hull until loading on the trucks, the heavy steel pieces or plates are never handled manually with bare hands in HKC compliant yards. 

– END OF TEXT –

For further enquiries, contact us at green@gmsinc.net

Read More


SCAN TO DOWNLOAD GMS APP

FOR